A little rain can’t stop SXSW. Husch Blackwell attorneys have attended dozens of interesting presentations and met countless innovative minds. We will continue to post live updates on Twitter (@HBhealthcarelaw) and release brief blog posts related to certain presentations throughout the event. With former VP Joe Biden in town to discuss his cancer moonshot today, our focus is precision medicine.

Precision medicine is an innovative approach to medical treatment that takes into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments, and lifestyles. The promise of precision medicine is delivering the right treatments, at the right time, to the right person. The potential of precision medicine is recognized at the highest levels of government. In his 2015 State of the Union address, former President Barack Obama launched the Precision Medicine Initiative (“PMI”), a bold new research effort to revolutionize health and the treatment of disease. Subsequently, Sylvia M. Burwell, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (“DHHS”), announced the FY 2016 budget would include $215 million for the PMI, with $200 million of this to be used by the National Institutes of Health (“NIH”) to launch the All of Us program, a national cohort of a million or more Americans who volunteer to share genetic, clinical, and other data to improve research. The funds will also be used to invest in expanding current cancer genomics research and to initiate new studies on how a tumor’s DNA can inform prognosis and treatment choices.Continue Reading Precision Medicine – The All of Us Program

Today kicks-off one of Austin’s largest and best-known events, the South by Southwest Interactive Conference. In the spirit of Husch Blackwell’s involvement in several aspects of the conference, this post will touch on emerging health technology and pushing the limits of HIPAA.

New technology is being developed to be used in healthcare settings on a

On April 29, 2016, the Joint Commission released an update (“Update”) providing for the use of text messaging to submit orders for patient care, treatment, or services to the hospital or other health care settings for all accreditation programs. Back in 2011, the Joint Commission believed that the technology necessary to secure contents of a text message, verify the identity of the person sending the message, and retain the original message within the medical record were not readily available, and, therefore, prohibited the use of text messaging to submit orders. However, this has changed as reasonably accessible technology has been developed which mitigates the security and record retention risks the Joint Commission previously identified. In the Update, the Joint Commission said, “effective immediately, licensed independent practitioners or other practitioners in accordance with professional standards of practice, law and regulation, and policies and procedures may text orders as long as a secure text messaging platform is used and the required components of an order are included.”
Continue Reading Orders can be submitted by text – the Joint Commission update