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Taylor focuses on healthcare regulatory matters. At Husch Blackwell, she focuses on matters such as healthcare privacy, confidentiality, and mental health law (including 42 C.F.R. Part 2, the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act, the SUPPORT for Patients & Communities Act, and emerging therapy). She also assists with issues relating to healthcare quality, including adverse event reporting, licensure and certification questions, and the Health Care Quality Improvement Act.

What Are the Changes?

On April 26, 2024, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) issued a final rule (the “Final Rule”) along with guidance updating the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) regulations at 45 C.F.R. Parts 160 and 164 (the “Privacy Rule”). The Final Rule prohibits the use or disclosure of protected health information (“PHI”) for the purpose of (1) conducting criminal, civil, or administrative investigations into, or (2) imposing criminal, civil, or administrative liability on any person for the mere act of seeking, obtaining, providing, or facilitating reproductive health care that is legal when provided. The Final Rule also prohibits the use or disclosure of PHI in order to (3) identify any person for any of those purposes (the “Prohibition”).[1]Continue Reading HHS Changes HIPAA Privacy Rule to Restrict the Disclosure of Reproductive Health Care Information

On February 8, 2024, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights (OCR) finalized long-awaited modifications to the Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) Patient Records regulations at 42 C.F.R. Part 2, which requires individuals or entities that receive federal funding and provide SUD treatment to implement additional privacy protections and obtain specific consent before using and disclosing SUD treatment records (see 42 C.F.R. § 2.11).Continue Reading Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Records: HHS Finalizes Changes to Part 2 Rule

In the United States, mental health (“MH”) and substance use disorder (“SUD”) (collectively “MH/SUD”) have continued to represent areas of intense concern. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the MH struggles of essential workers and health care professionals were pushed to the forefront. However, issues related to MH/SUD have continued to escalate.Continue Reading Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act: Comprehensive Final Rule Expected in 2024