Many long-term care residents live in Missouri nursing homes for years. But occasionally circumstances may change such that it is no longer appropriate for the resident to continue to reside at the facility. In certain cases, nursing homes may discharge or transfer a resident even if the resident does not consent to the discharge or transfer – this is known as an “involuntary discharge” or an “involuntary transfer.” In this case, the resident has the right to appeal the involuntary discharge or transfer.Continue Reading Avoiding the Pitfalls of Involuntary Nursing Home Discharges/Transfers in Missouri

Evaluation and management (E/M) services have been called “the core” of healthcare billing.[1] E/M is a catch-all claim, allowing medical professionals to bill for diagnosing or treating nearly any illness or injury. E/M is also divided into fairly subjective levels depending on complexity, and the differences between levels is often merely a difference of opinion. While the DOJ has brought cases based on disputes over E/M services before, those cases are typically civil and part of a more complex upcoding or unbundling scheme.[2] This is because nearly everything involving some effort expended by a physician could arguably justify that physician believing the E/M service was proper, and therefore criminal cases requiring scienter evidence that proves the case beyond a reasonable doubt are incredibly rare.

Yet one of those rare cases went to trial this month.Continue Reading Physician Loses Rare Criminal E/M Fraud Trial

Consistent with the Biden Administration’s whole-of-government approach to address perceived consolidation in a variety of industries, including in the healthcare industry, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Antitrust Division (collectively, the Agencies) are continuing to make good on their promise to increase scrutiny of mergers and acquisitions through newly proposed HSR rules and revised merger guidelines.Continue Reading Healthcare Industry Faces Heightened Antitrust Scrutiny Under New Merger Guidelines, HSR Rules

On June 14, 2023, a federal jury found that a Georgia physician knowingly violated the False Claims Act following a two-week trial on allegations that he made false claims to the Medicare Program. Now, despite just $1.1 million in improper payments stemming from false claims, a federal court is likely to impose a judgment that exceeds $27 million after adding statutory per-claim penalties and trebling the amount determined by the jury to be false.Continue Reading Georgia Physician Awaits $27+ Million Judgment Following False Claims Act Trial Loss

Following two weeks of trial testimony, a Travis County jury recently rendered a $10 million verdict in a novel corporate practice of medicine (CPOM) case. The jury found in favor of a physician hospitalist group that claimed a management company repeatedly broke its promise to comply with the state’s CPOM prohibition, putting profits over patients, among other wrongdoings.Continue Reading Texas Jury Renders $10 Million Verdict in Novel Corporate Practice of Medicine Case